WHAT IS CT?

Computed Tomography (CT), formerly known as CAT scanning, is a fast and painless diagnostic tool, which uses X-rays to take multiple slice images of the body. It is often used for imaging of the brain, chest, abdomen, spine and extremities. Often patients are given oral or intravenous contrast agents which increases the detail and clarity of the images taken.

DO I NEED AN APPOINTMENT?

Yes. Although the CT scanning itself will not take very long, you may be required to attend from anywhere between 15 to 90 minutes, depending on the scan. We ask if you could please call us to make an appointment or come in and arrange a suitable time.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:

Before your examination you must tell us if you:

  • Are pregnant, or suspect you are.
  • Have ever experienced a severe reaction to a previous injection of contrast media.
  • Are allergic to any prescribed medication.
  • Suffer from asthma.
  • Have kidney disease.
  • Are a diabetic.
  • Have any information you believe may be relevant to your examination.
WHAT TO BRING:
  • Referral from your doctor.
  • Previous films and/or reports. If you have had a previous examination in any of our practices, these can be electronically retrieved and you do not need to bring them with you.
  • Medication if you are asthmatic or diabetic.
  • Method of payment, including Medicare, Health or Pension Card.
  • For WorkCover claims, you will need the claim number, claim officer’s name and phone number, and any other relevant details.
WHO WILL DO MY CT?

A qualified and specially trained radiographer will perform your CT scan.

HOW DO I PREPARE FOR MY CT SCAN?

Preparation for CT can vary greatly, depending on what type of scan you are having done. Please refer to some generic preparation instructions below for some common scans (you should confirm your preparation instructions with one of our staff members at the time of booking).

No preparation is required for the following scans:

  • KUB (Kidneys, Ureter, Bladder)
  • Spine – cervical, thoracic, lumbar
  • Extremity – shoulder, elbow, hand, hip, knee, foot
  • Dental/Dentogram
  • Facial bones/sinuses
  • “HRCT” Chest (High Resolution Chest)

For the following scans, ensure you are well hydrated beforehand, as we may give you an injection of IV Contrast (x-ray dye). You may also be required to have a renal function blood test if you are a diabetic, have kidney problems, or are over 70 years of age.

  • Brain
  • Neck 
  • Chest
  • IVP (Intravenous Pyelogram)
  • All Angiograms (except Coronary Angiograms)

For the following scans, you must fast (nothing to eat) for 4 hours and ensure you are well hydrated beforehand, as we may give you some Oral Contrast to drink and an injection of IV Contrast (x-ray dye). You may also be required to have a renal function blood test if you are a diabetic, have kidney problems, or are over 70 years of age. You must arrive at the practice 1 hour prior to your appointment to drink the oral contrast.

  • Abdomen
  • Abdomen and Pelvis
  • Enterography
  • (or a combination of Abdomen and any other scan)
WHAT WILL HAPPEN DURING MY CT SCAN?

If you are having a scan that requires oral contrast, you will be asked to drink this over 1 hour in our waiting room – this will help to highlight the stomach and bowel on the scan. If you are having a scan that requires IV contrast (x-ray dye), you will be asked to complete a medical  history questionnaire and sign a consent form. We will also need to insert a small cannula (needle) into your arm so that we can administer the contrast intravenously (IV). 

When you are called for your scan, you will be taken into the CT room and asked to lie down on the CT table (you may be asked to change into a gown beforehand). The radiographer will position you and ensure everything is ready. You must lie as still as possible throughout the scan, as movement will blur the images. 

During the scan, the table will move in and out of the scanner, and you may be asked to hold your breath for a few seconds. You will also hear a soft ‘whooshing’ sound as the x-ray machine rotates inside the scanner. If you are having a scan that requires IV contrast, this will be injected half way through the scan. 

When the contrast is being administered, you may feel a warm flush throughout your body, as well as a metallic taste in your mouth. This is very common and passes quickly. For further information regarding IV contrast please see our Intravenous (IV) Contrast Information Sheet

You will be on the CT table for about 10-15 minutes for most examinations. There are no after effects from a CT scan and you can resume normal activity straight away. If IV contrast is given, we ask you to keep well hydrated for 24 hours afterwards.

CONTACT US

Ashfield

9716 3600

Campsie

 8042 3000

Drummoyne

9911 6800

Five Dock

8705 8300

Hurstville

9598 0100

Newtown

8228 9000

North Strathfield

8282 8100

North Sydney (Mater Imaging)

9955 4466
Go to top